OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe Ghost Writer Interviews_4.9.13
https://boulwareenterprises.wordpress.com/2013/04/08/the-ghost-writer-interviews/

Hello and welcome to this candid and informal interview of up and coming writer/author, of titles like, “The Spirit of The Soul and The Death of Morals,” “Hallow” and “Anthology of An Essayist, vols. 1 & 2” Gregory Vernon Boulware. Mr. Boulware has published several books and a plethora of online articles that embrace a host of genres. Join us in this three-part entertaining and enlightening visit with this awe inspiring author.

Thank you,

Your Online GhostWriter

Part 2
“So You’ve Become An Author, Why?”

G.W.:
Tell me Greg. why did you want to write a book?

G.V.B.:
Well, like I was trying to say with regard to the submission of my first published article, “IT and BI,” I don’t know…I felt a sense of responsibility.

G.W.:
What do you mean responsibility? To whom do you refer?

G.V.B.:
To all people who cannot afford or get into a so-called college classroom or tech school due to lack of money or economic status; those that wish to learn. It’s a responsibility to those who wish to know how Information Technology and Business Intelligence training can change their life for the better! It’s a lending hand in bridging and/or closing the gap of the “Great Digital Divide.” It’s what I’m supposed to do by direct order from ancestral beliefs and the “Most High!” It is my moral Decalogue…I’m supposed to reach back and help someone in any way that I can. Oh yes, with special assistance and attention to the enhancement of the imagination and the mind! If I wasn’t supposed to write, I wouldn’t be doing it.

Look Man, I’m past my sixtieth decade, living on a fixed income; dealing with the rigors of daily aches, pains, and the ills of everyday life (as it exists)…now don’t you think that I’d rather be out fishing instead?

G.W.:
Sorry Man, I didn’t mean to push your buttons…

G.V.B.:
No dude, not at all, you wanted to know so I had to tell you. Yo, I’m not expecting any miracles to happen simply because I’ve published some books; It’s also a legacy thing too. No one that I know of in my family has ever written a book. Most of the stuff that was passed along by the family elders was by word of mouth and maybe photographs. I remember seeing a picture of my grandmother when she was in her teens. Damn, she looked good! She was always one classy and sharp looking church-going lady while I was growing up in Philly. I also saw one of my grandfather when he was only a small boy in what appeared to be his neighborhood of Winnsboro, South Carolina. We have all heard stories of how miserable life was during the great depression. My granddad, Ernest ‘Buster’ Boulware, seemed to be a happy kid of about six or seven in one particular photograph. The environment also did not appear like that of the inner city ghetto’s either. My grandparents seemed to be doing well in those days…I don’t know, appearances can be deceiving. I asked my mother why they all came up north as opposed to remaining in the south. She said, “Hell boy, they all came up here because of jobs! We all needed to eat.”

G.W.:
Tell us Greg. who are you?

G.V.B.:
I’m a simple man who would like to be remembered as someone who made a difference…a significant if not small contribution to this world. I would like folks to know that I gave a damn about people, especially people who have not… To my knowledge, I am the only one in my family who has become a published author. I am the only male Boulware to have completed college, albeit, my sons have attended as well; the first of my grandmother’s male children to attend and graduate. Nothing has made me so proud as the look on her face when she saw me walk down that aisle at Girard College that day.
You see, I am the last of my kind…the last of the two-bloods. Many folks, including my family (teachers, neighbors, cousins, aunts, uncles, and such) had it in their minds that I’d never amount to much in this life. Well maybe I haven’t…but I can tell you this – I’ve successfully raised fine and successful sons through an equally successful marriage of nearly forty years, as well as becoming a proud and loving grandfather. None of them thought that I’d make it out of high school, let alone college. I wonder what they think of my so-called status now – what criticisms they have for me?

G.W.:
Wow, that’s heavy. Tell me, what you mean by the term ‘two-bloods?’ Explain to me what you mean by the last of your kind.

G.V.B.:
You see, its something that has probably happened many times in the south and taken for granted in the north; the cross breeding of two families. Take for example, you and I are buddies and I fall in love and marry your sister. You, in turn, fall in love and marry my sister. Get It? The two blood lines are now crossed and the arrival of children makes them the closest first cousins ever. The children become two-bloods by rights of the cross family marriages. The family name remains prominent and is shared across the two families. My grandfather is Boulware. My grandmother is Butler. Now, his sister becomes a Butler when she marries a Butler. My grandmother’s brother is George ‘Uncle Kutch’ Butler; his wife becomes a Butler who happens to be my grandfather’s sister. George Butler’s sister becomes a Boulware when she marries Ernest Boulware. Get it? So, I am the grandchild of a Boulware and a Butler. There are no other male children other than my cousin George ‘Butch’ Butler who are the bearers of the two bloodlines.

G.W.:
Fascinating… I’ve never thought of such a thing in my family. I wonder how many other families share that type of experience. Tell me, can you tell us about the talisman that hangs around your neck. I’ve noticed it in many of your online photo publishing’s.

G.V.B.:
Yeah, it’s the ‘Conch Shell.’ The conch is an emblem of power, authority and sovereignty whose blast is believed to banish evil spirits, averts natural disasters, and scare away poisonous creatures. My mother gave it to me when she arrived from her trip to Senegal West Africa. Upon researching its history, I’ve never taken it off since receiving it. It provides a sense of being connected to Mother Africa. My college friend William Brown, from The Berean Institute, went to Johannesburg with his brother and brought back some of the soil or ‘Red Earth’ for me. I keep it in a glass jar on my nightstand table next to my bed.

G.W.:
What about the wearing of the earring in your left ear?

G.V.B.:
Back in the day, Philly’s neighborhoods, specifically North, South, and West Philly; there were street gangs that thought the wearing of the earring was cool. It looked cool to many young Black men. Today, many of the white guys don the wearing of earrings as well. However, many of the sporting fellows don’t have a clue as to what and why the earring is worn. As history records the practice and belief in slavery, the slaves didn’t share in their owner’s pride of chattel. A method of resistance was established amongst the slave population. Some of this is explained in the ‘Maafa’ or ‘State of Bondage.’ The Maafa suggests that bondage for the ‘African American Descendent of Slaves’ has not ended. ‘Sankofa’ is the right of passage; the resistance. The meaning of Sankofa is to look to the past in order to know the future. The ‘Sankofa Bird’ is the remembering of how slavery came to be – the knowledge, truth, practice, belief, and remembrance of the African heritage and culture. The wearing of the ‘ring’ or earring in the left ear symbolizes the acknowledgement of the slave. So, in today’s lifestyles, the wearing of the earring has become a fashion statement. All of those guys who wear it in the right ear suggest something other than slavery – I don’t know what. You can make your best educated guess. Albeit, in Africa, the wearing of earrings in both ears was not frowned upon. I would hope that the young (and not so young) Black Men would get hep to this information and take that earring out of their right ears. They could all very well be given and getting the wrong type of attention and/or perception…just as they could quite possibly be portraying the wrong type of representation.

G.W.:
Do you think your works will make a difference to anyone?

G.V.B.:
I would certainly hope so… I mean having access to pertinent data or information could be a crucial piece of ammunition in and on the battlefield of lifestyles, careers, and employment. Is it better “to need and not have or to have and not need?”

G.W.:
Who are some of your favorite authors?

G.V.B.:
Oh my, there are so many… Asimov comes to mind almost immediately. Man, there is Dubois, Hughes, Dumas, Doyle, Robeson, Poe, Cosby, Harris, Singleton, Hayden, and so many others. I have no prejudices over who necessarily writes what, if its good work, I’m reading it. There is this one Brother who is most definitely profound. His name is Samuel F. Yette. He published a book that cost him his career, a teaching position at a university, and it got him blacklisted from other institutions. His publisher dropped him like a hot potato and pulled their publication support. He won back the rights of his written works and best seller in court. He was then able to republish and market the material on his own. The controversial but true text is titled “The Choice”: The Issue of Black Survival in America – The Extermination of the Black Man in America… It contains startling research and a genuine possibility of a series of government measures and proposals that appear to be leading America toward Black genocide. Drawing a wealth of fact and documentation, Mr. Yette lets us see White America through the eyes of Black America, and we learn why Blacks feel that the issue facing them is one of survival. You’ve all heard of the ‘Holocaust?’ Some denied its existence, yes? How many can deny slavery and the plan to get rid of useless and shiftless Black Folk who didn’t belong nor wanted in America?

Now, that’s a heavy and multi-profound book if ever I’ve read one. I would also recommend Harris Middleton’s ‘The Black Book’ as well. That’s a volume that will take you for a walk in that time of darkness for Black Folk in America.

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