The Re-Emergence of ‘A Timeless Epoch – An Ingrained Memory’

“Eyes on The Prize”

…The Return of a timeless classic reemerges January 17, 2016 on ‘PBS’ WorldChannel.org 

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The award-winning documentary series Eyes on the Prize tells the definitive story of the civil rights era from the point of view of the ordinary men and women whose extraordinary actions launched a movement that changed the fabric of American life, and embodied a struggle whose reverberations continue to be felt today.

http://worldchannel.org/

http://worldchannel.org/programs/eyes-on-the-prize/

Eyes on the Prize tells the definitive story of the civil rights era from the point of view of the ordinary men and women whose extraordinary actions launched a movement that changed the fabric of American life, and embodied a struggle whose reverberations continue to be felt today.

As Presented

By

Gregory V. Boulware, Esq.

http://blackhistory.com/cgi-bin/blog.cgi?id=641608

 

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The award-winning documentary series recounts the fight to end decades of discrimination and segregation from the murder of Emmett Till in 1955 to Harold Washington’s Mayoral Win of 1983 in Chicago. This is the story of the people — young and old, male and female, northern and southern — who, compelled by a meeting of conscience and circumstance, worked to eradicate a world where whites and blacks could not attend the same school, ride the same bus, vote in the same election, or participate equally in society. It was a time in which peaceful demonstrators were met with resistance and brutality — a reality that may once have been nearly incomprehensible to many young Americans but is all too undeniable once again today.

 

Through historical interviews and footage, the critically acclaimed Eyes on the Prize traces the civil rights movement from the Montgomery bus boycott to the Voting Rights Act; from early acts of individual courage through the flowering of a mass movement and its eventual split into factions.

 “Narrated by political leader and civil rights activist Julian Bond (1940-2015)”

 http://worldchannel.org/programs/eyes-on-the-prize/

 “When people saw what had happened to my son, men stood up who had never stood up before.” – Mamie Till Bradley, Emmett Till’s mother

 “Emmett Till, an African American teen from Chicago, is visiting relatives in Mississippi when he makes a fatal mistake – he whistles at a white woman, breaking the unwritten laws of the Jim Crow South. Three days later, two white men drag him from bed and brutally murder him. Despite national outrage and the testimony of eyewitnesses including Emmett’s uncle Moses Wright, Mississippi finds the accused not guilty. Safe from being tried twice for the same crime, the men later admit their guilt and describe details of the lynching.

 ~ Till’s death and his killers’ acquittal help ignite the civil rights movement ~

 “…people wanted to continue that boycott. They had been touched by the persecution, the humiliation…they voted for it unanimously…” – Jo Ann Robinson, boycott organizer

 

After Emmett Till’s murder, civil rights activist Rosa Parks is arrested after refusing to give up her seat on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Her arrest inspires black leaders to mount a one-day bus boycott with 40,000 people. The success of the event leads to a year-long boycott led by 26-year-old Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. During the time, the bus company suffers economically, bombs are thrown at organizers’ homes, and the white Citizens Council and the Ku Klux Klan hold rallies. At last, a Supreme Court decision integrates the buses; thousands of black riders are on the buses again…sitting where they please.”

 http://worldchannel.org/programs/episode/eyes-prize-awakenings-1954-1956/

 “”Supreme Court or no Supreme Court, we are going to maintain segregated schools down in Dixie.” – U. S. Senator James Eastland, Democrat from Mississippi

 

Southern whites resist the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, which states that separate school facilities are inherently unequal and orders school integration. Several southern governors lead the way in preventing integration, claiming the federal government is intervening in state matters, and pledge to maintain the South’s traditions and heritage. The NAACP’s legal team files suit to open the doors of public educational institutions to African Americans.

 

– Alabama: In 1956, mob rule and violence are used to keep Autherine Lucy from enrolling in the University of Alabama. A court decision backs her efforts.

 

– Arkansas: In 1957, a group of African American high school students, known as the Little Rock Nine, pass through angry crowds to integrate Arkansas’s Central High School. They are protected by paratroopers dispatched by President Dwight Eisenhower and advised by state NAACP officials.

 

– Louisiana: In 1960, white residents riot over four black girls entering a desegregated first-grade classroom in New Orleans.

 

– Mississippi: In 1936, James Meredith is barred from registering at the University of Mississippi by Governor Ross Barnett. Barnett engages in negotiations with President John Kennedy, who then sends federal marshals to the campus. A mob of segregationists erupts in violence, killing two people and wounding others before the U.S. Army restores order. Ultimately, Meredith will enroll and graduate from the university.

 

~ Virginia: “The governor chooses to close schools rather than allow integration” ~

 http://worldchannel.org/programs/episode/eyes-prize-fighting-back-1957-1962/

 “”The workshops in nonviolence made the difference…the philosophy…the tactics, the techniques, how to…take the blows and still respond with…dignity.” — Reverend C. T. Vivian, Nashville activist

 

Southern cities maintain segregated public facilities like a Greensboro, North Carolina lunch counter, where four black college students stage the first sit-in. The non-violent sit-in movement spreads to 69 cities across the South with black communities organizing economic boycotts and sympathetic Northerners picketing stores. In Nashville, protesters are arrested and attacked but do not retaliate. The bombing of the house of Z. Alexander Looby, a lawyer working with the activists, led to thousands marching to City Hall. Mayor Ben West concedes that lunch counter segregation is wrong and businesses quickly desegregate. Elated with success, students found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

 

“Segregation must be stopped…we’ll take hitting, we’ll take beating. We’re willing to accept death. But we’re going to keep coming…” — Jim Zwerg, Freedom Rider

 

The Supreme Court has twice-banned segregation in interstate travel but Southern states widely ignore the rulings. In May 1961, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) sends Freedom Riders, mixed-race groups of non-violent volunteers, on bus trips. They meet with violent resistance in Alabama, especially in Birmingham and Montgomery. As violence rages, the U.S. Marshals and Alabama National Guard are called in by President John F. Kennedy and Governor John Patterson, respectively. The Riders continue without violence under protection into Mississippi, but are arrested and sentenced to a maximum-security prison. Over the next few months, 300 riders are arrested and sentenced in Mississippi alone. Ultimately, the Freedom Riders win when the Interstate Commerce Commission bans segregation in interstate travel.”

  http://worldchannel.org/programs/episode/eyes-prize-aint-scared-your-jails-1960-1961/

  “We learned…that you must pinpoint your targets so that you do not dilute the strength of your attack.” – Reverend Wyatt Tee Walker, SCLC leader

 

In Albany, Georgia, the movement experiences what some will call its greatest defeat. The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) arrives in 1961 to help Black Citizens combat segregation but by year’s end, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. is asked to provide support to the Albany movement. Police chief Laurie Pritchett, who has studied the non-violent tactics, avoids creating scenes of police brutality, and even arranges for someone to pay King’s and Rev. Ralph Abernathy’s bail so the leaders are not a magnet for unwelcome attention. Conflicts also arise between the SNCC and King’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) over leadership issues. In July 1962, a federal judge issues a restraining order against the protesters, leaving Albany segregated. But Albany’s black community presses on.

 

“The events in Birmingham…have so increased the cries for equality that no city or state or legislative body can prudently choose to ignore them.” — President John F. Kennedy

 

In Birmingham, Alabama, a city notorious for its racial hatred, activists launch Project “C” (confrontation) and Martin Luther King, Jr. writes his “Letter from Birmingham Jail.” By May, activists begin recruiting children to march; 1000 children peacefully protest only to have fire hoses and police dogs turned on them. After five days, 2500 protesters fill the jails, 2000 of them children. Birmingham business leaders make a deal with protesters, promising to desegregate public facilities and begin an employment program. In response, the Klan bombs King’s hotel though he has already left town. The crowd that gathers is beaten by police, leading to a riot and protests in other cities, showing that the non-violent approach has its limits.

 

“Those…, who exhort patience in the name of a false peace, are in fact supporting segregation and exploitation. They would have social peace at the expense of social and racial justice.”

~ A. Philip Randolph, March organizer ~

 

Civil rights leaders plan for a march in Washington, D.C. to demonstrate for jobs and freedom. Through opposition, labor and civil rights leader A. Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin, organizer of the march’s complex logistics, press ahead. On August 28, 1963, over 200,000 people gather on the National Mall to listen to Martin Luther King, Jr. deliver his “I Have a Dream” speech, declaring, “That my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character…” The March on Washington is a triumph but less than three weeks later; the Ku Klux Klan bombs the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham. Fifteen people are injured and ‘Four Young Girls are killed.’”

 http://worldchannel.org/programs/episode/eyes-prize-no-easy-walk-1961-1963/

 Discover the unsolved mysteries behind the family stories of political organizer Donna Brazile, actor Ty Burrell and artist Kara Walker as they learn how the legacy of slavery has shaped their identities.

 

In the series “Finding Your Roots,” Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr. is helping people discover long-lost relatives hidden for generations within the branches of their family trees. Professor Gates employs a team of genealogists to reconstruct the paper trail left behind by our ancestors while geneticists decode our DNA and help us travel thousands of years into the past to discover the origins of our earliest forebears.

http://worldchannel.org/programs/episode/finding-your-roots-stories-we-tell/

http://worldchannel.org/schedule/

 http://blackhistory.com/cgi-bin/blog.cgi?id=641608

 

“Maafa: Life After Conquest”

The Ruin Of A Nation Begins In The Homes Of Its People

By

Gregory V. Boulware

https://boulwareenterprises.wordpress.com/2014/11/30/maafa-life-after-conquest/  

http://blackinamerica.com/cgi-bin/blog.cgi?blog_id=273292&cid=10  

 

How – Where Is It possible For A Human Being To Have Peace Where There Is No Justice?

 

While many Americans continue to allow themselves to be brainwashed, distracted, and preoccupied with ‘Black Friday’ sales and other deceptive clandestine practices of ripping you off…”Give Me All Your Money!” The killing of another Black Youth sounded the alarm for unification. The focused marchers are ‘Marching’ and the focused protesters are ‘Protesting’ the continuing saga of Black elimination which is once again brought forth.

 

~The Maafa Did Not End With The Emancipation Proclamation~

…It began when the 1st African became shackled to the bottom of a slave ship!

Is there a hidden racial agenda in white America? There are many who believe it is so…

http://blackhistory.com/content/273292/maafa-life-after-conquest

 

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http://www.BoulwareEnterprises.com

 

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