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George Washington’s Letter to the Sultan of Morocco, 12.1.1789, New York City.

http://www.mountvernon.org/digital-encyclopedia/article/morocco/

 

~”Washington’s Plea to the Sultan of Morocco In The Americas”~

download.Sultan of Morocco1789_4.12.16

By

Gregory V. Boulware, Esq.

 

‘Washington’s Letter of Plea to The Black Sultan of Morocco’ provides more proof that The Black Man was in the land’s identified as ‘The United States of America!’ Oh Yes, We Were Here First!

 

“It gives me Pleasure to have this Opportunity of assuring your Majesty that, while I remain at the Head of this Nation, I shall not cease to promote every Measure that may conduce to the Friendship and Harmony, which so happily subsist between your Empire and them.”

~George Washington~

 

…Continued From The Article:

“Coat of Arms”

http://blackhistory.com/cgi-bin/blog.cgi?blog_id=292074&cid=10  

George Washington wrote a letter pleading with the ‘Sultan of Morocco’ for permission to reside and engage in commerce in the ‘Americas without being destroyed!’ The letter is dated December 1st, 1789, as recorded and archived in New York City. This shows the ruling culture of the Americas during that era. Oh yes, ruled and governed by Black People, the sovereign body of the land.

download.ArmouredKingJames_4.12.16

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=king%20james%20coat%20of%20arms  

 

~ Who Are The Moors–Jabbar Gaines El, Civil Alert Radio – www.Moorishsociety.com ~

 

King JamesVIandI:

‘A Black King of Moorish Descent’

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=black+king+james+history

Published on Jun 10, 2013

A brief history video and Biblical scriptures regarding the true King James VI who descended from a ruling line of black Kings and Queens in Europe; which began after the defeat of Rome in 193 AD. The Black ruling monarchs lasted until The Renaissance Period roughly 1500 – 1600. James commissioned Hebrew Israelites to translate the records & history of a biblical people into what is now known as “The Kings James 1611 Bible.”

134.3.BlackKingJames_4.12.16

 

Images of Black King James:

https://www.google.com/search?q=king+james+coat+of+arms&espv=2&biw=1137&bih=741&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwio9s7Ri4rMAhWMMSYKHaCYAHoQ7AkIMQ&dpr=0.9#tbm=isch&tbs=rimg%3ACcYfIJrQBWWRIjj1TwFQ82GNZSBWrInyBv3e2XiKE0oYdE50fREvEMJn_1N28zaLhLNKm2l4IY2g7gPCTNu32mknDHyoSCfVPAVDzYY1lEZFI1jHf7IzaKhIJIFasifIG_1d4RkUjWMd_1sjNoqEgnZeIoTShh0ThHugJLJIedrEyoSCXR9ES8Qwmf8EZFI1jHf7IzaKhIJ3bzNouEs0qYRD5_1ZWi2B_1_10qEgnaXghjaDuA8BGhq6YWyIhl4yoSCZM27faaScMfERSECqLyAC7k&q=king%20james%20coat%20of%20arms

 

“The Dark Ages Black Monarchy of Europe King James”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ci2iXB3GJj0

 

The White-Faced Versions:

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=king%20james%201

 

Hidden Colors:

“The Moors, The Greatest Race-Traitors In Black History”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOzI3GTU6Cc

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Hidden+Colors+%22The+Moors%2C+The+Greatest+Race-Traitors+In+Black+History%22

 

“Slavery and George Washington”

http://www.mountvernon.org/george-washington/biography/?gclid=COSggJL6icwCFcYfhgodFlcOaQ

 

At age 11, George Washington inherited 10 slaves from his father. In those days in Virginia, the institution of slavery was considered “a given” and slaves, like land and other property, could be bought, sold, given away, rented out, and passed down through inheritance. As a young man, George was no different from other members of the Virginia planter class in his attitude that there was nothing morally wrong with slavery.

 

When he married Martha, Washington more than doubled the number of slaves under his control through “dower slaves” that she brought to the marriage. In 1759, there were about 40 slaves living at Mount Vernon. Although Washington had control over the dower slaves as a result of his marriage, they were not his property; instead they belonged to the estate of Martha’s first husband.

 

Washington’s enslaved manservant, Billy Lee, entered the war at Washington’s side and stayed with him throughout the revolution. Like his owner, Billy Lee was widely known as a courageous and expert horseman.

 

As Washington prepared his will, he drew up a list of the Mount Vernon slaves who belonged to either the Custis estate or to him. He found that altogether there were 316 enslaved men, women, and children living at Mount Vernon. Some of these individuals worked in the fields, while others were employed as house servants or as craftsmen in more than a dozen specialties ranging from blacksmithing, to spinning, to bricklaying, weaving, and cooking, to name just a few. At the time of the 1799 census, nearly half of Mount Vernon’s enslaved population was either too old or too young to work.

 

Washington made provisions in his will to free all of his own slaves but could not free those (or the descendants of those) whom Martha had brought to the marriage. By Virginia law, her grandchildren would inherit her “dower slaves.” Because the two groups had intermarried, emancipation of Washington’s slaves proved bittersweet.

 

By freeing his slaves, George Washington tried to set an example for others to follow. He was the only slaveholder among the founding fathers to free his slaves.

 

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Morocco · George Washington’s Mount Vernon

http://www.mountvernon.org/search/?q=moors#gsc.tab=0&gsc.q=moors&gsc.page=1

http://www.mountvernon.org/digital-encyclopedia/article/morocco/

 

Morocco

HOMEDIGITAL ENCYCLOPEDIA MOROCCO

Morocco

About the Encyclopedia

Contributors

Call for Authors

Washington Research Library

9

 

“Great and Magnanimous Friend, Mohammed Ibn Abdullah, The Emperor of Morocco”

http://www.mountvernon.org/digital-encyclopedia/article/morocco/

 

On December 1, 1789, George Washington sat down to write a letter to an old friend of his country. Ironically, however, the letter recipient was someone that Washington had never met. Just over seven months earlier, Washington had been inaugurated the first president of the United States and had set up his office in the country’s temporary capital of New York City.

 

In the intervening months, he had begun putting together his cabinet, gotten Mrs. Washington and the two grandchildren they were raising settled in their new house, organized a scheme for his official entertaining, survived a near-fatal illness, and taken a one-month tour of the New England states. Now, as he started the letter, he began with the salutation, “Great and Magnanimous Friend.” The recipient of the letter he wrote that day was Mohammed Ibn Abdullah, the Emperor of Morocco.1

 

Sidi Mohammed learned about the American colonies’ struggle for independence through the French consul assigned to Morocco and via European newspapers. He began reaching out to the Americans on December 20, 1777, by including them on a list of countries who would be welcomed in Moroccan ports. In an effort to assist the process of opening diplomatic relations with the new country, several months later the Moroccan Emperor appointed a French merchant, Etienne Caille, to serve as consul for unrepresented nations—including the new United States—at his court.

 

Caille got to work quickly, writing on April 14, 1778 to Benjamin Franklin the American minister to France. Upon receiving the letter, Franklin sought the advice of French officials, who suggested that “it was not safe to have any correspondence with him.” Caille also tried to get through to the Americans via their minister in Madrid, John Jay.2

 

The American response must have disappointing. Years after Sidi Mohammed had first offered to open his ports to American shipping, president of the Continental Congress Samuel Huntington wrote to a friend to say that he had just received a letter on “Behalf of the Emperor inviting these United States to trade in his Ports.”3 It was another three months, in December 1780, before the President of Congress finally responded to the Emperor, assuring him of congressional desire “to cultivate a sincere and firm Peace, and Friendship with your Majesty, and to make it lasting to all Posterity.”4

 

Relations continued at a slow pace for another four years—seven years after the Emperor’s initial overtures to the Americans. In May of 1784, the Continental Congress “Resolved, That treaties of amity, or of amity and commerce, be entered into with Morocco, and the regencies of Algiers, Tunis and Tripoly, to continue for the same term of ten years, or for a term as much longer as can be procured.” After noting “That the occupations of the war and distance of our situation have prevented our meeting [the Emperor’s] friendship so early as we wished,” Congress also “Resolved, That a commission be issued to Mr. J. Adams, Mr. B. Franklin and Mr. T. Jefferson, giving powers to them…to make and receive propositions for such treaties of amity and Commerce, and to negotiate and sign the same, transmitting them to Congress for their final ratification; and that such commission be in force for a term not exceeding two years.”5

 

However, in Morocco, the Emperor would not have known about these developments until months later. Feeling that he needed to do something dramatic to get the Americans’ attention, he ordered the capture of an American ship and held it until he was sure that progress was finally underway. In August 1785, Thomas Jefferson wrote to a friend at home, confirming the story, explaining: “You have been told with truth that the Emperor of Marocco has shewn disposition to enter into treaty with us: but not truly that Congress has not attended to his advances and thereby disgusted him. . . His dispositions continue good. As a proof of this, he has lately released freely and cloathed well the crew of an American brig he took last winter.”6

 

The new American special agent for Morocco, Thomas Barclay, was appointed in October 1785 and arrived in the country the following summer. Within a week of his arrival in June 1786, Barclay met twice with the Emperor and was able to report that, “It will be agreeable…for you to know that the last draught of the treaty is made, and will probably be signed in a few days, and that our stay here will not exceed that of a week from this time.”7 The treaty negotiations were completed by the middle of July 1786 and Barclay set out for Europe. It took another year for the treaty to go into effect, signed by two of the Americans ministers, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, in January 1787. The treaty was ratified by Congress in July of the same year, and finally signed by the president of Congress on July 18, 1787.” It would remain in effect for fifty years.

 

It had taken almost ten years to bring the treaty to fruition, but when George Washington sat down to write his letter to the Emperor of Morocco, he knew that this friendship was significant. After explaining the change in the government with the adoption of the new Constitution, and introducing himself as the new head of the American government, Washington assured Sidi Mohammed that “The Encouragement which your Majesty has been pleased, generously, to give to our Commerce with your Dominions; the Punctuality with which you have caused the Treaty with us to be observed …make a deep Impression on the United States, and confirm their Respect for, and Attachment to your Imperial Majesty.”

 

Washington continued, explaining that, “It gives me Pleasure to have this Opportunity of assuring your Majesty that, while I remain at the Head of this Nation, I shall not cease to promote every Measure that may conduce to the Friendship and Harmony, which so happily subsist between your Empire and them.” Washington closed with these words of blessing: “May the Almighty bless your Imperial Majesty, our great and magnanimous Friend, with his constant Guidance and Protection.”9 Sadly, in keeping with the tenor of the confusing and complicated negotiations, Sidi Mohammed never received George Washington’s letter—the Emperor passed away two months before the missive arrived.

 

Mary V. Thompson

Research Historian

Mount Vernon Estate and Gardens

 

Notes:

  1. “George Washington to [Sidi Mohammed], The Emperor of Morocco, 1 December 1789,” The Writings of George Washington, Vol. 30, ed. John C. Fitzpatrick (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office), 474-6.

 

  1. “Samuel Huntington to Etienne d’Audibert Caille,” Letters of Delegates to Congress, Vol. 16 (September 1, 1780-February 28, 1781), eds. Paul H. Smith and others (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, 1989), 519n.

 

  1. “Samuel Huntington to Jonathan Trumbull, Sr., 4 September 4, 1780,” Letters of Delegates to Congress, Vol. 16 (September 1, 1780-February 28, 1781), eds. Paul H. Smith and others (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, 1989), 16 & 17, 17n3 & 17n4.

 

  1. “Samuel Huntington to the Sultan of Morocco, [December 1780],” in Letters of Delegates to Congress, 16:519 & 519n, 16:520.

 

  1. “Resolution, 7 May 1784,” Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789, 26:361-362.

 

  1. “Thomas Jefferson to John Page, 20 August 1785,” The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, 8:418-419.

 

  1. “Thomas Barclay to American Peace Commissioners, 26 June 1786,” The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Volume 10 (June 22, 1786-December 31, 1786), ed. Julian P. Boyd and others (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1954), 71-2.

 

  1. Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789, 585.

 

9.”George Washington to [Sidi Mohammed], The Emperor of Morocco, 1 December 1789,” The Writings of George Washington, Vol. 30, ed. John C. Fitzpatrick (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office), 474-6.

 

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Morocco

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/hlaw:@field%28DOCID+@lit%28dg016426%29%29:

 

Letters of Delegates to Congress: Volume 16 September 1, 1780 – February 28, 1781

Samuel Huntington to the Sultan of Morocco

 

[December 1780] The Congress of the Thirteen United States of North America, to the High, Potent and Most Noble Prince, The King and Emperour of Morocco.

Most noble and puissant Prince!

 

We, the Congress of the Thirteen United States of North America, have been informed of Your Majesty’s favourable Regard to the Interests of the People we represent; which has been communicated by Mons Etienne D’Audibert Caille, of Salee, Consul for Foreign Nations unrepresented in Your Majesty’s States. (1) We assure you of our earnest Desire to cultivate a sincere and firm Peace, and Friendship with your Majesty, and to make it lasting to all Posterity.

 

In Order that we may demonstrate more fully the high Value we place upon the Amity of so enlightened and magnanimous a Prince, we have given the necessary Orders to our Minister Plenipotentiary at the Court of His Most Christian Majesty, the King of France, and a proper Person will receive Powers to enter into Negociations for settling a Treaty of Peace and Commerce with such representative of Your Majesty as you may please to appoint. This, from Your Majesty’s great Wisdom and Generosity, we have no Doubt will be adjusted to the mutual Advantage of both Nations.

 

In the mean Time should any of the Subjects of our States come within <<your Majesty’s>Ports or Territories, we flatter ourselves they will receive the Benefit of your Protection and Benevolence. You may assure yourself of every Protection and Assistance to your Subjects from the People of these States whenever and wherever they may have it in their Power.

 

We pray your Majesty may enjoy long Life and uninterrupted Prosperity.

Signed in, and by Order of the Congress of the thirteen, United States of North America, Day of the Month of December in the year of our LORD Christ 1780 and of our Independence.

 

FC (DNA: PCC, item 98). In the hand of William Churchill Houston.

(1) See the preceding entry.

 

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A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: U.S. Congressional Documents and Debates, 1774-1875

 

Letters of Delegates to Congress: Volume 16 September 1, 1780 – February 28, 1781 –Artemas Ward to Unknown

 

Letters of Delegates to Congress: Volume 16 September 1, 1780 – February 28, 1781

Artemas Ward to Unknown

 

Sir [December 1780] (1)

Your Letter of the twenty fourth of Novr. last is at last come to hand; for which I return you my warmest thanks. With astonishment I read the several pieces of Intelligence. In the year 1760 Octor. 25.

 

Page 521

DECEMBER 1780

Link to date-related documents.

Artemas Ward

Page 522

 

DECEMBER 1780

Link to date-related documents.

 

G_____ the third came to the Throne. What declarations & Promises did he make? What fulsome addresses were presented to him? On the 25 of Octor. 80._____ (2) came to the throne [. . .] has he promised & recommended in words, and what fulsome nonsense has been presented to him, by way [of] addresses? Has the conduct of the two gr[eat men] anyways comported with their former declarations & engagements? I [ think ] not at all. The conduct of the last has been such if I am rightly informed, that the Jealousy of all ought to be awakened, Lest the morals of the people are debauched by his evil examples & [. . .] State we become a profligate Commonwealth. However I am always for making the best of everything-I think it is a smile in Providence that he has discovered himself so dearly to the people and so early after his accession (as it is called in one of the acts). Unless the people are Stupidly blind (which I don’t think they are) they will see their error, and if proper measures are taken previous to the next-to rouse the Genious of old Cato to address them in the mouth of & in the manner mentioned by my friend, great good will arise to the Community. People many times run into excesses for want of consideration & when this is the case there is no more effectual way to bring them to a sense of their duty than, to address them in a serious, and Solemn manner. It is of importance that it should be done in due season; should it be delayed until the people are habituated to these Views it will be more difficult to bring them off & there will be danger of a general corruption of morals. Should this corruption spread we shall have reason to fear that destruction will follow. I am sometimes ready to fear that, this Generation must be moved of[f] the Stage [before?] Peace, Liberty & Righteousness will flourish on this Continent in a manner wished for. The Stiff necked Israelites of old, were made to wander in the wilderness until the rebellious generation were dead before the tribes of Israel were permitted to enjoy the Promised land. Innumerable have been the remarkable appearances of Divine Providence in favour of this people but alas how unmindful have they been of the Hand that supported and the Ar[m] that saved them. If there was that attention paid to Virtue and Religion which ought to be, and a sincere desire to acknowledge God in all our ways we might then have grounds to hope in the Divine favour for deliverance from a[ll] the Calamities we now feel. But so long as the people with their rulers at their head are in pursute of folly & vanity, we have no reason to expect anything [but] that the hand of the Lord will be stretched out against us & we be made to feel [the] terribleness of His wrath. It is the duty of every one to exert himself to info[rm] the ignorant and to reclaim the vicious, to stir up the minds of all to a sense [of] their duty, that the great exertions of our Pious ancestors to establish a re[fuge] for Liberty & Righteousness on this continent may not at this period be lo[st] through the abounding folly & wickedness of us their degenerate offspring.

 

Page 523

JANUARY 1, 1781

Link to date-related documents.

 

FC (MHi: Ward Papers). In the hand of Artemas Ward.

(1) Although this letter is undated, Ward was responding to one ‘of the twenty fourth of Novr. lasts from an unknown correspondent who had obviously discussed the October 25, 1780, inauguration of John Hancock as governor of Massachusetts.

(2) That is, John Hancock.

 

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Documents from the Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention, 1774-1789

 

The United States of America, in Congress assembled, to all who shall see these presents, greetings : Whereas the United States of America in Congress assembled, by their commission bearing date the twelfth day of May one thousand seven hundred and eighty-four, thought proper to constitute John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson, their ministers plenipotentiary, giving to them, or a majority of them, full powers to confer, treat and negociate with the ambassador, minister or commissioner of His Majesty the Emperor of Morocco

 

1.

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=bdsdcc&fileName=22601//bdsdcc22601.db&recNum=0&itemLink=r?ammem/bdsbib:@field%28NUMBER+@od1%28bdsdcc+22601%29%29&linkText=0&presId=bdsbib

 

2.

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=bdsdcc&fileName=22601//bdsdcc22601.db&recNum=1&itemLink=r?ammem/bdsbib:@field%28NUMBER+@od1%28bdsdcc+22601%29%29&linkText=0

 

3.

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=bdsdcc&fileName=22601//bdsdcc22601.db&recNum=2&itemLink=r?ammem/bdsbib:@field%28NUMBER+@od1%28bdsdcc+22601%29%29&linkText=0

 

4.

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=bdsdcc&fileName=22601//bdsdcc22601.db&recNum=3&itemLink=r?ammem/bdsbib:@field%28NUMBER+@od1%28bdsdcc+22601%29%29&linkText=0

 

5.

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/hlaw:@field%28DOCID+@lit%28dg016426%29%29:

 

‘Untold Black History: The Moors and Myths Surrounding The Slavery Holocaust’

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6R43NfNQc9o

 

Images of The Sultan of Morocco:

https://www.google.com/search?q=Image+of+the+Sultan+of+Morocco+1789&espv=2&biw=1137&bih=692&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjspuHikYrMAhWDOiYKHdv8CJwQ7AkIOA&dpr=0.9#imgrc=_nuDpiOkKXB2CM%3A

 

This report is significant in the delivery of data and/or information regarding the ‘True History’ of Blacks in World History. Many images and records of Prominent Black Leadership around the world have been ‘white-washed’ in order to present the only leadership possible is that of the white race. This article provides historic detail and recordings of agreements, pleas, deals, and pacts of bi-racial communications to the contrary whereas the lunatic assumptions detailing whites as the leaders and progenitors of “the True World Order.”

 

~ “It’s Not The Things You Know, It’s The Things You Know That Just Ain’t So!” ~

 

 

Til Next Time…

 

In Pride, Justice, Truth, Peace, and Love,

 

‘G’

http://blackhistory.com/cgi-bin/blog.cgi?id=641608 

 

 

~ “SANKOFA” the “MAAFA” ~

 

 

 

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