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~’Life and Death Is What Matters!’~

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By

Gregory V. Boulware, Esq.

http://www.BoulwareEnterprises.com

 

“Justice or Else!”

 

People Who Use “#AllLivesMatter” Are Not Understanding What Black Lives Matter Really Means…

 

“We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of ‘Now.’ This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. ‘Now’ is the time to make real the promises of democracy. ‘Now’ is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God’s children. It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment.”

~ Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ~

 

“That until the philosophy which holds one race superior and another inferior is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned: That until there are no longer first-class and second-class citizens of any nation; That until the color of a man’s skin is of no more significance than the color of his eyes; That until the basic human rights are equally guaranteed to all without regard to race; That until that day, the dream of lasting peace and world citizenship and the rule of international morality will remain but a fleeting illusion, to be pursued but never attained and until the ignoble but unhappy regimes that hold our brothers in Angola, in Mozambique, and in South Africa in subhuman bondage have been toppled and destroyed; until bigotry and prejudice and malicious and inhuman self-interest have been replaced by understanding and tolerance and goodwill; until all Africans stand and speak as free human beings, equal in the eyes of the Almighty; until that day, the African continent shall not know peace. We Africans will fight if necessary and we know that we shall win as we are confident in the victory of good over evil.”

~Emperor Haile Sellassie~

 (As Translated From French to English By Brother Robert ‘Bob’ Marley)

 

“Consider ‘God’s’ Handiwork; Who Can Straighten What ‘He’ Hath Made Crooked?”

~ Ecclesiastes 7:13 ~

 

“Black Lives Matter doesn’t mean that all lives don’t matter, what it means is that black lives matter do as well. And we live in a society that unfortunately teaches people — and usually it is the people that are hashtagging #AllLivesMatter — that Black Lives are less important than theirs. And anybody that lives in America and thinks that that isn’t taught is a fucking idiot and surrounded by an information-proof shield and is probably a racist. Or Donald Trump, if not all three …”

 

PARTY CHAT

July 12, 2016

Ice-T, Franchesca Ramsey, Lea DeLaria, and More on the Problem With ‘All Lives Matter’

By

Dee Lockett and Heather Buckley

http://www.vulture.com/2016/07/12-celebs-on-the-problem-with-all-lives-matter.html

 

While Donald Trump, Rudy Giuliani, and corrupted users of the internet continue to disparage the merits of Black Lives Matter, the realities that inspired the movement weren’t up for debate at the return of VH1’s Hip-Hop Honors on Monday night at New York City’s Lincoln Center.

 

“If I go outside and try to hail a cab, and he passes me for the white woman standing right there, racism is still alive and kicking,” Queen Latifah, one of the night’s honorees, said in her speech. “We have to change that. And I’m not blaming the white lady; she needed a cab, too. I’m just saying we need to change this attitude.”

 

It’s a hypothetical that indirectly subverts “All Lives Matter” — a popular dissenting hashtag used mostly by white people as a counterargument for “Black Lives Matter” — which has come under fire for being, at best, reductive, and at worst, racist.

 

Vulture asked 12 attendees at VH1’s Hip-Hop Honors for their thoughts on why All Lives Matter is so problematic — and why it’s not.

 

Orange Is the New Black:

“Black Lives Matter doesn’t mean that all lives don’t matter, what it means is that Black Lives Matter do as well. And we live in a society that unfortunately teaches people — and usually it is the people that are hashtagging #AllLivesMatter — that black lives are less important than theirs. And anybody that lives in America and thinks that that isn’t taught is a fucking idiot and surrounded by an information-proof shield and is probably a racist. Or Donald Trump, if not all three… [The shootings were] pretty horrifying, I have to say. I’ve been basically crying since Orlando. I’ve been weeping for My People, for my Brothers and Sisters, for My Country, for this World. It’s not good what’s going on right now, and that’s why — I’m sorry, I’m going right to politics: Get out in November and vote for Hillary Clinton. Because she’s the only one that’s gonna make a change.”

~ Lea DeLaria, Actress ~

 

SVU:

“I understand all lives matter, that’s why people are saying, you know, we all should address each other as humans. I love that sentiment. That’s how I feel. But when I say ‘Black Lives Matter,’ and you say ‘all lives matter,’ that’s like you saying, ‘women’s rights’ and I say, ‘human rights.’ It dilutes what you’re saying … But here’s the big thing to Black Lives Matter: Black People have to understand that Black Lives Matter also. We’re killing ourselves at a far more alarming rate than the police are killing us. So we have to address our black-on-black crime, our stuff that’s going on in the hood also, along with police brutality. That’s the big problem. It’s just, all of our lives, especially Black People, we need to just get in check to address our worth, and take care of ourselves.”

~Ice-T, Rapper & Actor, Law and Order~

 

 

The Nightly Show With Larry Wilmore:

“People that use that hashtag don’t realize that Black Lives Matter does not mean that our lives matter more than anyone else’s. It’s a call to action, because unfortunately, our stories don’t get told, and unfortunately, we often don’t get justice when we have innocent victims die at the hands of police violence. And so I think that people who use “#AllLivesMatter” are not understanding what Black Lives Matter really means … We had a video of Rodney King, and you saw how that worked out. So yes, I’m glad that camera phones are making this accessible to lots of people, but at the same time, for a lot of us, this is not new information. We’ve known that this has been happening. But I do think, though, that the positive side of it is that a lot of people who did not realize that racism is still a problem, that police brutality and racial profiling is a problem, are having their eyes opened to it.”

~ Franchesca Ramsey, Comedian-Activist-Correspondent ~

 

Hamilton:

“Many analogies have been made at this point, but the fact of the matter is: Yes, all lives matter, but the lives that we’re talking about right now are Black Lives, because those are the ones in acute danger. And, really, the cracks in the systemic infrastructure that’s been built through the belief in white superiority that’s been created in this country is really what’s responsible for it, and I’m glad that those things are starting to reveal themselves, you know? So that we can have these conversations and we can start to really enact a process of reconciliation and change, because that’s what’s required: awareness, reconciliation, and change.”

~ Brandon Victor Dixon, Actor ~

 

What’s Going On?:

“All that matters to me is that ‘Black Lives Matter,’ and everything that’s going on just needs to stop. It needs to. All we can do is come together, get the word out. You know, use our platforms to get it out and not just sit back and act like we don’t see or know what’s going on.”

~ Teyana Taylor, Singer ~

 

Orange Is the New Black:

“I think it’s just completely missing the point. There’s a reason why #BlackLivesMatter was a hashtag to begin with — it’s to point out the fact that black lives were being targeted unfairly and to pull out #AllLivesMatter is like, ‘Duh!’ Of course! But we’re not talking about that right now. Clearly, if all lives mattered, this shit wouldn’t be happening.”

~ Emma Myles, Actress ~

 

Love & Hip-Hop – ‘Justice or Else!’:

“I think people just get this whole thing misconstrued: Of course, I want everyone to matter. I think everyone deserves a fair chance, but right now, there are young African-American Men and Women that are being targeted for these injustices. So if I go to the doctor because I have a broken arm, of course all my bones matter, but the broken arm is what’s broken. And right now, the justice system is broken toward these African-American People, and that’s all that they’ve got to admit … I was in Atlanta two days after the horrible incident in Baton Rouge and what I felt was unity. I saw a lot of people hurt, broken, in pain, and that were really wanting change. You know, there were people standing on cars, there were people climbing poles, in trees, screaming and yelling, ‘We’re gonna be all right!’ Screaming and yelling, ‘Justice or else!’ And it kind of felt euphoric. It felt really amazing to have all those many people with the same beliefs and the same fight in one space.”

~ Yandy Smith-Harris, Reality Star ~

 

My Culture, My People:

“I can understand how everyone — as a human being — feels that their life matters, but right now, what we have going on is with Black Lives, and that’s what matters at this moment. Not saying that I’m taking away any value from anyone else’s life, but the fact is the situation that’s going on now is taking place with My Culture, with My People, so therefore we need to get that word out. And I understand that sometimes when people see something getting some attention, they automatically feel that they want to jump in it, or they want to divert people’s attention from it, or they want to make it seem like that — until it happens to them.”

~ Roxanne Shanté, Rapper ~

 

Real Conversations:

“All lives do matter, and I think that it’s okay to say Black Lives Matter, but you know, I don’t have a problem celebrating that life matters, humanity matters. But you know, it shouldn’t overshadow the issues with Black Lives Matter, because it’s a serious [issue] right now.”

~ Melody Fox, Host of Real Conversation ~

 

Take Care of The Problem:

“Yeah, everyone’s lives matter; we just need to fix the problem that’s going on right now. Right now, we see a rise in black and Latino [deaths]. We just need to really pay attention. People are upset because they’re not focusing on the problem. Take care of the problem and there won’t be any anger. We can get rid of this whole situation. We just need to take care of the issues.”

~ Coco Austin, Actress ~

 

Naughty By Nature:

Vinnie: “All lives do matter. But when certain things are going on and you say, ‘All Black Lives Matter’ — I mean, let it be there. Have your own different hashtag. Don’t look like you’re just trying to take and degrade what somebody else is standing for, because all lives do matter, but you have to respect what’s going on right now, the plight of the Black Man, Black Woman, Black People, what we’re going through. Give us our chance to do it. That’s like on Mother’s Day, if you’re talking about how great the fathers are. You’ve gotta give mothers their Mother’s Day props. You’ve gotta give fathers their Father’s Day props.”

 

KG: “Right, and it’s because – you know Black Lives Matter, that doesn’t necessarily mean we’re saying that all lives don’t matter, because all lives matter, it’s under ‘all lives.’ You just gave a great point: If you’re saying ‘Happy Mother’s Day’ on Mother’s Day, that doesn’t mean that you don’t want to give props to the fathers. It’s just at that point, we’re showing props to the mother.”

~ Naughty By Nature (Vin Rock, DJ Kay Gee, Treach), Rappers ~

 

Immigrants:

Africans arrived on these shores with valuable assets for both Europeans and Native Americans. They were used for agriculture labor and working in field gangs, something unfamiliar to most Indians. As experts in tropical agriculture, they had a lot to teach both white and Red people. Africans had a virtual immunity to European diseases such as smallpox, which wiped out Native Americans.

For Europeans seeking a source of labor that could not escape, Africans were ideal because they were three thousand miles from home. They could not flee to loved ones, as Indian slave could. African men and women who fled could always be identified by skin color, and Black became the badge of bondage.

~ https://boulwareenterprises.wordpress.com/2013/10/25/shaman/ ~

 

Who Are Police Killing?

Mike Males

Published: August 26, 2014

http://www.cjcj.org/news/8113

 

While recent killings by police in Ferguson, Missouri, and New York City receive national attention, the fact is that from 1999 through 2011, American law enforcement officers killed 4,531 people, 96 percent by firearms and 96 percent of them men, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.* The rate of police killings of African Americans has fallen by 70 percent over the last 40-50 years, but their risk remains much higher than that of Whites, Latinos, and Asians.

 

The five states or jurisdictions where a person is most likely to be killed by law enforcement are New Mexico, Nevada, District of Columbia, Oregon, and Maryland. California ranks sixth from the top. Alabama, North Carolina, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and New York are the safest (or, perhaps, the worst at reporting).

 

The major counties and urban jurisdictions with the highest rates of law enforcement killings are Wyandotte County (Kansas City); Denver County, Baltimore (city), Norfolk (city), and Anderson County, South Carolina; interestingly, Harris County (Houston) has the lowest reported rate. Fresno, Riverside, Kern, San Bernardino, and San Diego have the highest rates in California; Contra Costa has the lowest.

 

The racial group most likely to be killed by law enforcement is Native Americans, followed by African Americans, Latinos, Whites, and Asian Americans.

 

Native Americans, 0.8 percent of the population, comprise 1.9 percent of police killings. African Americans, 13 percent of the population, are victims in 26 percent of police shootings. Law enforcement kills African Americans at 2.8 times the rate of white non-Latinos, and 4.3 times the rate of Asians.

 

Latinos are victimized by police killings at a level 30 percent above average and 1.9 times the rate of White, non-Latinos.

 

One-fourth of those killed by law enforcement are under age 25, 54 percent are ages 25-44, and nearly one-fourth are ages 45 and older. Teenagers comprise only 7 percent of all police killings. The risk of an older teen age 15-19 being killed by police is about the same as for a 50 year-old; for a younger teen age 10-14, about the same as for an 80 year-old.

 

While statistics are always suspect over time, killings by law enforcement officers appear to be much lower today than in the past. In the late 1960s, nearly 100 young black men under age 25 were killed by law enforcement every year. Even as the black youth and young adult population doubled over the last 40 years, police shootings of young black men fell to around 35 per year in the 2000s, a rate decline of 79 percent. While younger African Americans were the victims in 1 in 4 killings by police in the 1968-74 periods and 1 in 7 in 1975-84, today, that proportion is 1 in 10.

 

Similarly, police killings of African Americans 25 and older have declined by 61 percent since the late 1960s. Still, the rates for younger African Americans remain 4.5 times higher, and for older African Americans 1.7 times higher, than for other races and ages.

 

*These are called “legal interventions,” defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as “injuries inflicted by the police or other law-enforcing agents . . . in the course of arresting or attempting to arrest lawbreakers, suppressing disturbances, maintaining order, and other legal action.

 

Keywords: Mike Males, police, police practices, racial disparities

Posted in Blog, Social Justice…

 

Police are Killing Native Americans at A Higher Rate Than Any Race, and Nobody is Talking About It

Matt Agorist  August 2, 2015

http://thefreethoughtproject.com/police-killing-native-americans-higher-rate-race-talking/

 

Despite gaining citizenship rights in 1924, Native Americans have yet to see the day that they enjoy benefits of a nation which boasts “liberty and justice for all.”

 

Unsettling reports of unfair treatment towards Native peoples by law enforcement are not isolated incidents—rather they are endemic of a deeply discriminatory justice system. Native American men are admitted to prison at four times the rate of white men and Native women at six-fold the rate of white women. Additionally, Native Americans are the racial group most likely to be killed by law enforcement.

 

Americans are up in arms right now over the near epidemic number of deaths of African-American at the hands of police, and rightfully so. African-Americans make up only 13 percent of the population, yet they are the victims in 26 percent of all police shootings. That is nearly 3 times the rate of whites.

 

The outrage by the #Black Lives Matter movement is founded in statistical evidence which shows that the system inherently and with extreme bias disproportionately targets blacks.

That being said, there is one group who no one is talking about that is targeted more than everyone else. The racial group most likely to be killed by law enforcement is Native Americans. While Native Americans only make up 0.8 percent of the population, they make up 1.9 percent of all police killings.

 

Where is the outrage in the media for Native Americans?

 

It’s certainly not due to the lack of protests by the #NativeLivesMatter movement, as there are many of those. In fact, several of the Native American activists within the movement have been killed by police, causing even more outrage in the community.

 

Earlier this month, Native American activist, Rexdale W. Henry, 53, was arrested for failure to pay a traffic fine. Five days later, on July 14, Henry would be found dead in a Neshoba County, Mississippi jail cell.

 

Just days before Henry’s tragic death, another Native American woman was found dead in a jail cell. She was arrested for an alleged bond violation over a traffic charge. Sarah Lee Circle Bear was heard by her cellmates screaming for help prior to being found unresponsive in her cell.

 

On July 12, Paul Castaway, a Native American who suffered from schizophrenia, was gunned down by police. According to witnesses, he was holding a knife to his own throat during an episode when police shot and killed him.

 

Last December, 30-year-old Allen Locke was shot and killed by police, just one day after attending a protest against police brutality. Locke is a Native-American man who attended a #NativeLivesMatter rally that was being held locally.

 

Native American children are also victims of the state as a recent report from TruthOut pointed out earlier this month. According to the report, in South Dakota, Indigenous children make up 15 percent of the child population, but comprise more than half the children in foster care.

 

In order to profit off of the kidnapping of these children, South Dakota has claimed 100% of its foster children as ‘special needs’ for the past ten years in order to reel in extra money. The child “protective” system in South Dakota is incentivized by a $79,000 bonus per Native child.

 

The situation is nothing short of modern day human trafficking and murder, yet the media is silent.

 

Why?

 

The answer to that question is not a simple one. However, one potential aspect of why the media and the government do not address the disproportionate targeting of natives by the state, is that it’s not divisive enough.

 

The Black Lives Matter movement has been used by the government and MSM to stoke a level of divide which hasn’t existed in this country since the days of Jim Crow. This divide is a necessary function of controlled media and it’s an essential part of the state’s existence.

 

#NativeLivesMatter doesn’t foster the same divide, therefore it’s not important to the establishment. However, it is important to those of us who care about the suffering and death of our fellow humans.

 

The good news is that through the power of social media, together we can shed light on these injustices. By sharing these stories and the work of the Lakota People’s Law Project, we can help to change this paradigm.

~ http://www.lakotalaw.org/action ~

 

Read more:

http://thefreethoughtproject.com/police-killing-native-americans-higher-rate-race-talking/#BYLtH75PVYmtBVWC.99

 

With all that has been said and proven, in sympathy I do offer prayers and condolences to the families of the fallen officers…but what of the families of the fallen innocents who were felled (and continue to fall) by officers who continue to walk (or ride) a beat, raise a family, eat a Hot-Dog, enjoy a sip of coffee, chew on a donut, eat a cheesesteak, have a glass of beer, attend a ballgame, and simply enjoy all that life has to offer.

 

Abhorring the killing of cops via sniper(s), what would they expect from a people who have had their fill of being slaughtered? An “Uprising” is inevitable in and of all forms of society. A “BackLash” or revolt is the only thing left after everything else has been attempted.

 

“By a campaign of propaganda we condition men’s minds for nuclear warfare. Provocative remarks fly about freely. We use aggression even in words; harsh judgments, ill will, anger, are all insidious forms of violence. We live in an age, which is aware of its’ own defeat and moral coarsening, an age in which old certainties are breaking down; the familiar patterns are tilting and cracking. There is increasing intolerance and embitterment. The creative flame that kindled the great human society is languishing. He who wrongs no one fears no one. He has nothing to hide and so is fearless. He looks everyone in the face. His step is firm, his body upright, and his words are direct and straight.”

~ Mahatma Gandhi ~

http://thegreatmediatorjustwords.blogspot.com/

 

Death:

“It is nothing to kill a people physically who has already been killed Culturally, Psychologically, Historically, Linguistically, Spiritually and Economically as a result of Disenfranchising them from their Ancestral lands.

A suit and a tie with a nice smile and a hand shake, with a 401k plan to offer is not going to solve the systemic and endemic problems of our people….particularly our youth who we have been allowed to be continually miseducated by the descendants of savages.”

~ http://arcoftheprophet.blogspot.com/ ~

 

It’s been said, “The Road to Hell is Paved with Good Intentions.”

 

The intention of the colonists was to find a new life in the America’s. It didn’t matter if other people occupied the new land or not. The intention was to gain freedom from religious persecution, oppression and succession from England and its sovereign nations. They took the kindness of the indigenous people of the America’s for weakness as they systematically delivered to them their impending doom. The annihilation and extermination was planned by the European occupiers of the land of colored people for the intended good of those who have decided to dwell in this new world.

 

Before, during, and after the successful revolution, slavery was incorporated for the good of the occupiers of New America. Forty-four Presidents have led the way in the plight of freedom for Americans, with good intentions; as well as for those who do not possess the same ideology. It is they who are and remain a threat to the pursuit of “Life, Liberty, and Justice for All – the American Dream!”

~ “The Intention of Good Intensions,” GVB, Esq., 7.16.12 ~

 

 

“It Would Be Truly Fatal For The Nation To Overlook The Urgency Of The Moment!”

 

 

 

…History Remember Thyself!

 

 

 

Have You Asked Yourselves What Really Matters…?

 

 

 

 

Til Next Time…

 

 

In Pride, Truth, Justice, and Peace,

 

“G”

http://www.BoulwareEnterprises.wordpress.com    

 

~ “SANKOFA” the “MAAFA” ~

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Race in America:

Views on Racial Disparities 50 Years Later

http://www.diversityinc.com/news/race-in-america-views-on-racial-disparities-50-years-later/?utm_source=SailThru&utm_campaign=newsletterLuke&utm_medium=DI&utm_content=2013-10-01&utm_term=news

By

Chris Hoenig

 

Cop Killings By Race:

https://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=A0LEVwy1QohX_1oACJKl87UF;_ylc=X1MDOTU4MTA0NjkEX3IDMgRmcgNocC1kZGMtYmQEZ3ByaWQDN2llYUl1R1dSWjY5M01SZERUSWdwQQRuX3JzbHQDMARuX3N1Z2cDNARvcmlnaW4Dc2VhcmNoLnlhaG9vLmNvbQRwb3MDMQRwcXN0cgNpbmRpZ2Vub3VzJTIwY29wJTIwa2lsbGluZ3MEcHFzdHJsAzIzBHFzdHJsAzM5BHF1ZXJ5A2luZGlnZW5vdXMlMjBjb3AlMjBraWxsaW5ncyUyMGJ5JTIwcmFjZQR0X3N0bXADMTQ2ODU0NzgwMQ–?p=indigenous+cop+killings+by+race&fr=hp-ddc-bd&fr2=sa-gp-search&type=bg_840_bl-is-17__alt__ddc_dsssyc_bd_com&iscqry=

 

 

~ “SANKOFA” the “MAAFA” ~

http://blackhistory.com/content/273292/maafa-life-after-conquest

http://blackhistory.com/content/288611/sankofa-never-to-forget

http://blackinamerica.com/content/291364/blacks-secret-history-in-america-truth-about-slavery