Tag Archive: William Still


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“What is a man who does not try and make the World better?”

‘Black American Freedom Fighters’
Submitted By

Gregory V. Boulware

Thomas L. Jennings was the first Afro-American protest marcher on record.
He was born as a freeman in N.Y. State in 1791. Jennings paraded through the streets of N.Y. with a banner showing a Black slave and saying “Am I NOT A MAN AND A BROTHER?”
Slavery was abolished in New York State in 1827.
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David Walker was a Black militant who wrote the famous pamphlet “Walker’s Appeal” in 1829.
In 1830 the Georgia legislature passed a bill making it a capital offense to circulate literature inciting slaves to revolt. In 1830, the state of Georgia offered $10,000 for the capture of Walker. The appeal said:
“And wo, wo, will be to you if we have to obtain our freedom by fighting… I declare to you, while you keep us and our children in bondage, and treat us like brutes, to make us support you and your families, we cannot be your friends.
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Reverend Henry H. Garnet escaped from slavery when he was eleven years old. In 1843 his CALL TO SLAVES TO REVOLT made at the Negro convention in N.Y. lost by one vote.
…go to your lordly enslavers and tell them that they have no more right to oppress you than you have to enslave them…
“STRIKE FOR YOUR LIVES AND LIBERTIES…Let every slave throughout the land do this, and the days of slavery are numbered… Rather die freemen than live to be slaves”
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Because white shipyard workmen would not allow him to work alongside them, the man who defeated Garnet’s ‘Call To Revolt’ by a resolution calling for “Moral Suasion” was an escaped slave who taught himself to read and write. He went to work for the Anti-Slavery Society and became a famous speaker and writer. Though he opposed ‘The Call To Revolt’ in 1843. By 1849 he was writing: “If there is no struggle, there is no progress. …this struggle may be a moral one; or it may be a physical one; or it may be both moral and physical’ but it must be a struggle. Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did, and it never will.”
Frederick Douglas
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Over one hundred years ago, Dr. John S. Rock, a distinguished Boston physician, the first Black attorney admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court, made a speech which might have been called Black Is Beautiful; said in 1858, ‘if any man does not fancy my color, that is his business, and I shall not meddle with it. I shall give myself no trouble because he lacks good taste… when I contrast the fine tough muscular system, the beautiful, rich color, the full broad features, and the gracefully frizzled hair of the Negro, with the delicate physical organization, wan color, sharp features and lank hair of the caucasion, I am inclined to believe that when the white man was created, nature was pretty well exhausted – but determined to keep up appearances, she pinched up his features, and did the best she could under the circumstances.
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Henry M. Turner, a Black legislator, was denied his seat upon election.
He made a six hour speech and said: “Whose Legislature is this? …thy question my right to a seat in this body, to represent the people whose legal votes elected me. .. This objection, sir, is an unheard of monopoly of power…the great question, sir, is this: Am I a man? If I am such, I claim the rights of man…!”
After massive protests in Washington D.C., he, and 26 other Black representatives and Senators were finally seated. However, democratic representation in the South, was only to last a few short years.
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“WE BELIEVE THIS COUNTRY, SO POWERFUL ABROAD, IS UNABLE TO PROTECT ITS CITIZENS AT HOME!”
In 1898 Ida B. Wells led a delegation of women and Congressmen to President McKinley to protest the lynching of a Black Postmaster. Miss Wells was one of the founders of the NAACP. At 14 she raised four younger sisters and brothers. She put herself through college and led a campaign against lynching which resulted in mob attacks on her and her printing press. Miss Wells was forced to carry two pistols for self protection.
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Dr. William E. B. DuBois, who wrote “Mr. Washington represents in Negro thought the old attitudes of adjustment and submission; and Mr. Washington’s program practically accepts the alleged inferiority of the Negro race… On the contrary, Negroes must resist continually…that voting is necessary to modern mankind, that color discrimination is barbarism, and that Black Boys need education as well as white boys!
Mr. Washington’s doctrine has tended to make the whites, north and south, shift the burden of the Negro problem to the Negroe’s shoulders…when in fact the burden belongs to the nation, and the hands of none of us are clean if we bend not our energies to righting these great wrongs.”
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Many young Americans of all colors consider Malcolm X (El Haag Malik El Shabazz) a symbol of uncompromising resistance to oppression. Before his assassination, he modified his philosophy about hating all white men and came to believe that African Americans should take part in a world-wide struggle for human rights. He said: “Brothers and Sisters always remember… if it doesn’t take senators and congressmen and presidential proclamations or a Supreme Court decisions to give freedom to the Black Man. You let that white man know, if this is a country of freedom, let it be a country of freedom; and if it’s not a country of freedom, change it!
We will work with anybody, anywhere, at any time, who is genuinely interested in tackling the problem head-on, non-violently as long as the enemy is non-violent; but violent when the enemy gets violent with us!”
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“Black Power” was an expression coined by Brother Stokely Carmicheal. He said: “Integration…speaks to the problem of Blackness in a despicable way…in order to have a decent house or education, Blacks must move into a white neighborhood or send their children to a white school. This reinforces, among both Black and White, the idea that ‘white’ is automatically better and ‘Black’ is by definition inferior…
Such situations will not change until Black people have power… Then Negroes become equal in a way that means something, and integration ceases to be a one-way street!”
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Dr. Reverend Martin Luther King, often a victim of white violence, believed that it was right to disobey some laws. Writing from the Birmingham
Alabama jail cell: “One may ask, how can you advocate breaking some laws and obeying others? …I, advocate obeying just laws. Conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws.
…I had hoped that the white moderate would understand that law and order exist for the purpose of establishing justice, and that when they fail to do this they become dangerously structured dams that block the flow of social progress.”
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William Still (October 7, 1821 – July 14, 1902) was an African-American abolitionist, conductor on the Underground Railroad, writer, historian and civil rights activist.

The date of William Still’s birth is given as October 7, 1821, by most sources, but he gave the date of November 1819 in the 1900 Census. He was born in Burlington County, New Jersey, to Charity and Levin Still. His parents had come to New Jersey from the Eastern Shore of Maryland as ex-slaves. He was the youngest of eighteen siblings, who included James Still, known as “the Doctor of the Pines,” Peter Still, Mary Still, and Kitturah Still, who moved to Philadelphia.

William’s father was the first of the family to move to New Jersey. A free man, he had been manumitted in 1798 in Caroline County, Maryland. Levin eventually settled in Evesham near Medford and later Charity joined the family with their four children, when she escaped. Charity was recaptured and returned to slavery, but she escaped a second time and, with her two daughters, found her way to Burlington County, to join her husband. The two sons she left behind, Levin and Peter were sold to slave-owners in Lexington, Kentucky, and then later, sent to Alabama in the Deep South.

Abolitionist In 1844, William Still moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he began working as a clerk for the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society. When Philadelphia abolitionists organized a committee to aid runaway slaves reaching Philadelphia, Still became its chairman. By the 1850s, Still was a leader of Philadelphia’s African-American community. In 1859 he attempted to desegregate the city’s public transit system. He opened a stove store during the American Civil War, and later started a coal delivery business.

In 1847 he married Letitia George and had four children who survived infancy. Their oldest was Caroline Matilda Still (1848–1919), a pioneer female medical doctor. Caroline attended Oberlin College and the Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia (much later the Medical College of Pennsylvania); she was married, first to Edward J. Wyley, and after his death, to the Reverend Matthew Anderson, longtime pastor of the Berean Presbyterian Church in North Philadelphia. She had an extensive private medical practice in Philadelphia and was also a community activist, teacher and leader. William Wilberforce Still (1864–1914) graduated from Lincoln University and subsequently practiced law in Philadelphia; Robert George Still (1861–1896), was a journalist who owned a print shop on Pine at 11th Street in central Philadelphia and Frances Ellen Still (1875–1930) became a kindergarten teacher (she was named after poet Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, who lived with the Stills before her marriage). On the 1900 U.S. Census William Still said he had two children, William W and Ellen, still living in his household, as well as a daughter-in-law.

Underground Railroad Often called “The Father of the Underground Railroad,” Still helped as many as 800 slaves escape to freedom, interviewing each person and keeping careful records, including a brief biography and the destination of each person, along with any alias that they adopted, though he kept his records carefully hidden. Still worked with other Underground Railroad agents operating in the south and in many counties in southern Pennsylvania. His network to freedom also included agents in New Jersey, New York, New England and Canada. Harriet Tubman traveled through his office with fellow passengers on several occasions during the 1850s. After the Civil War, Still published the secret notes he’d kept in diaries during those years, and his book is a source of many historical details of the workings of the Underground Railroad. He is one of the many who helped slaves escape from the United States. The three prominent Still brothers—William, James, and Peter—settled in Lawnside, New Jersey. To this day, their descendants have an annual family reunion every August. Notable members of the Still family include the composer William Grant Still, professional basketball player Valerie Still and professional NFL defensive end Art Still.
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~Foundation For Change, 1619 Broadway, New York, New York~
‘Eyewitness: The Negro in American History’
By William Loren Katz/Pitman

‘Chronicles of Black Protest’
By Bradford Chambers/Fawcett

‘Pioneers On Protest’
By Lerone Bennett, Jr./Johnson

Recommended Reading:
‘The Choice: The Issue of Black Survival In America – The Extermination Of The Black Man In America…’
By Samuel F. Yette/Berkley

‘William Still’
Wkipedia.com
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“Quality Education vs. Accreditation”

by

Gregory V. Boulware

8.25.9

Education:

“The act or process of educating or being educated; the knowledge or skill obtained or developed by a learning process!”

Inquiries into furthering my educational aspirations were made to various colleges within my immediate environmental area. Several of the schools contacted required placement exams that I did not challenge, as I am adept and very capable of dealing with college examinations. The thing that got to me was the disparaging remarks from some college recruiters regarding their standards for education as opposed to another college. One of the schools that I’ve attended is a two-year degree school while the other is as well. They hold real estate in the same zip code and competed for students in the same local. They both educated local students as well as out of state and students from other countries and nations.

One school considered itself superior to the other by reason of accreditation. The school that was described as inferior did not have middle states accreditation. The school was described as below standard by the other. The so-called superior school is lead and operated by a non-HBCU affiliation while the other happened to be lead and operated by an African American staff. The self-described superior school has made plans, designs, and did bid for the take-over of the African American school. Albeit, the self-described superior school admits that it does not and will not accept credentials from the so-called inferior school. I have attended both of these institutions and received very good instruction from its teachers as well. While the lessons learned were an invaluable source of information, the education that I received from personal academic research (self-taught) has enhanced my knowledge base. Money was not a factor in my personal research, study, and/or practicum. I would add, the knowledge and information that was derived from the HBCU School proved to be equally rewarding as the other if not better!

Personally, I would say that I received more educational value at the HBCU (Historical Black Colleges and Universities) as opposed to the other collegiate institution. Albeit, they both required money.

When students visit college campuses they are encouraged to become a student at that particular school. The tour guides’ show all of the amenities and accolades that are offered in order to get you enrolled…and to gain your tuition monies. But what about the quality of education offered by the particular schools? The majority of the colleges will often quote their accreditation as compared to another school of choice. What has accreditation to do with a good and valuable quality education? Money! And the ability to make money! Education does not and should not require money!

In 1899 Dr. Matthew Anderson, an outstanding community leader, and his wife Caroline Still Anderson founded Berean Manual and Industrial School. Dr. Anderson was a pivotal influence in the religious, business, and educational history of Philadelphia. Dr. Anderson also founded the Berean Presbyterian Church and the Berean Savings Fund Society.

Caroline Still is the daughter of the great William Still, a Philadelphia Abolitionist.

Mr. William Still, a self-educated man, one of seventeen children, was born in Burlington County in 1821. His father escaped slavery from Maryland to New Jersey and was later followed by his wife and children. William Still left New Jersey for Philadelphia in 1844. Three years later he was appointed secretary of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society.

When Brother William Still was 23, he left the family farm in New Jersey for Philadelphia, to seek his fortune. He arrived, friendless with only five dollars in his possession. Mr. Still taught himself to read and write. In fact, so well, that in three years he was able to gain and hold the position of secretary in the Pennsylvania Abolition Society. Brother Still provided the all-white society with his views on how to aid fugitive slaves. After all, he had been one himself. He was such an asset to the group, that he was elected chairman in 1851. Still held the position for the next ten years. He also became chairman of the Vigilance Committee in 1852. Still was the first black man to join the society and was able to provide first-hand experience of what it was like to be a slave

Mr. Still established a profitable coal business in Philadelphia. His house was used as one of the stations on the Underground Railroad. Brother Still interviewed escaped fugitives and kept careful records of each so that their family and friends might locate them. According to his records, Still helped 649 slaves receive their freedom. The number is compounded with the number of slaves saved by Sister Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad.

“William Still, a self-educated man, began his campaign to end racial discrimination on Philadelphia streetcars. He wrote an account of this campaign in Struggle for the Civil Rights of the Coloured People of Philadelphia in the City Railway Cars (1867). He followed this with The Underground Railroad (1872) and Voting and Laboring (1874).”

”William Still, a self-educated man, established an orphanage for the children of African-American soldiers and sailors. Other charitable work included the founding of a Mission Sabbath School and working with the Young Men’s Christian Association. William Still died in Philadelphia on 14th July, 1902.”

The Concise History of Berean Institute! 

“In 1904 Berean Institute of Philadelphia Pennsylvania qualified for state aid and received a grant of $10,000. Over the years, state aid has enabled the school to expand its services and diversify its programs of study. Funds from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania now provide a significant portion of the total operating budget. Berean Institute embarked on a program of expansion under the dynamic leadership of the late Dr. William H. Gray, Jr., who utilized the support of many influential citizens of Pennsylvania including the former Governor Milton J. Shapp. Dr. Gray served as Chairman of the Berean Board of Trustees. Under Dr. Gray’s leadership Berean Manual and Industrial School began operating as Berean Institute. He also had Berean Institute’s current building constructed in 1973.”

“Mrs. Lucille P. Blondin, who served the school for forty-five years, became Berean Institute’s first President. Mrs. Blondin retired in June 1993. Dr. Norman K. Spencer was appointed to serve as the second President and Chief Executive Officer. Under Dr. Spencer’s leadership, contracted programs funded by the City and Commonwealth agencies as well as community outreach projects have been added. Hon. John Braxton, former Judge, Court of Common Pleas heads a list of distinguished Board of Trustees members.”

“Berean Institute enrolled students in full and part-time programs. Most of the students are residents of the Commonwealth and live in Philadelphia. Other students have come from Central and South America, China, India, Puerto Rico, Tonga, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Tanzania, the Dominican Republic, England, Cambodia, Viet Nam and states along the eastern seaboard of the United States.”

“A number of students come to learn a marketable skill and their Berean training fulfills their current educational aspirations. Many others regard the school as a stepping-stone to further education. Berean has many graduates who have gone on to earn four-year college degrees and others who have completed graduate studies at some of the area’s outstanding institutions of higher learning.”

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Department of Education granted Berean Institute approval to award the Associate in Specialized Technology Degree on September 15, 1976, and the Associate in Specialized Business Degree on December 27, 1976.

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Again, education is:

“The act or process of imparting or acquiring general knowledge, developing the powers of reasoning and judgment, and generally of preparing oneself or others intellectually for mature life; the act or process of imparting or acquiring particular knowledge or skills, as for a profession; a degree, level, or kind of schooling: a university education; .the result produced by instruction, training, or study: to show one’s education; the science or art of teaching; pedagogics.”

A definition of education: ‘The act or process of educating or being educated; the knowledge or skill obtained or developed by a learning process; a program of instruction of a specified kind or level: driver education; a college education; the field of study that is concerned with the pedagogy of teaching and learning; an instructive or enlightening experience: Her work in the inner city was a real education’. Origin: 1525–35; (< MF) < L ēducātiōn- (s. of ēducātiō), equiv. to ēducāt (us) (see educate) + -iōn- -ion

Synonyms:
Instruction, schooling, learning. Education, training implies a discipline and development by means of study and learning. Education is the development of the abilities of the mind (learning to know): a liberal education. Training is practical education (learning to do) or practice, usually under supervision, in some art, trade, or profession: training in art, teacher training; Learning, knowledge, and enlightenment. Education, culture are often used interchangeably to mean the results of schooling. Education, however, suggests chiefly the information acquired. Culture is a mode of thought and feeling encouraged by education. It suggests an aspiration toward, and an appreciation of high intellectual and esthetic ideals: The level of culture in a country depends upon the education of its people.

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2009

So why does another school rate it’s accreditation over and above that of another? Money! Many colleges and universities rate its’ educational values based on the amount of money in its’ coffers as well as the amount of money that they can amass!  Another tool to increase superiority in the education business is to attain and maintain accreditation and as many acquisitions as possible.

Several opinions suggest education achieved through these venues is designed to prepare people/students for the job market as opposed to being prepared for life skills. The skills required to carry ones posterity and their descendants that follow into prosperous futures.

Is it fair to assess the stature of a collegiate institution above any other based on the amount of money that is needed to be spent or the amount of education that is achieved? Ivy league institutions turn out many students who are not prepared for the challenges of life…but many of them are rich and have spent thousands of dollars to attend those schools as well as graduating from them. On the other hand, many poor people that are lucky enough to qualify for grants, loans, scholarships, etc., are better prepared to face the challenges set before them (so it seems).

Many poor and working poor students seem to value the collegiate level education as if their life depended upon it, so they tend to work a bit harder to achieve the degree status. The document can be deemed worthless when the graduate cannot find the desired job for which he/she has studied. It is even worse when the graduated student finds that they are worse off than when they started college. They are now burdened with school loan debt plus the debts that they have had to meet before attending college. Working at McDonalds and the like, seem to be the only job that is attainable for many of them. The competition is fierce. These students are for the most part, grouped in with many applicants that are not college educated and many do not have high school diplomas as well! The knowledge attained is not considered or tested by many of these employers. Kiosk type pictures on a cash-register computer is what they have to work with. Is this not insulting to a student who has studied computer science, read and write computer programs and its languages, as well as other academics of study?

Why is it that many non-ivy league students find themselves out of work? Why is it that many of them find that they are the first to lose their employment positions compared to their ivy-league colleagues? Why is it that many inner-city college educated graduates find themselves less likely to be selected as team-leaders than their counter part ivy-leaguers? Many employers advertise their openings with statements that don’t require a college level education. They ask that candidates simply have a high school level education. College educated candidates apply to those openings and find themselves scrutinized out of the running, i.e., background checks, credit checks, criminal histories, schooling activities, etc. Why is it college educated candidates find that not only do they have to compete with ivy-leaguers, they have to compete with high school educated folks as well. What is the sense in enduring hours, years, and other sacrifices to attain the coveted two and/or four-year college level degree when you’re not going to qualify for the job anyway?

The notion of accreditation, money, and notable stature should not be the basis of choosing the collegiate route to education. Education should be based on ones ability to achieve, retain, and utilize education. The achievement of education begins in the home (as well as anyone who desires it). It begins with the Childs’ upbringing and the stressed importance placed by the parent and/or guardian. Should the child be highly scholastic in abilities that enable him/her to be described as intellectually talented above average, that student deserves free college education. While the rest of us who are collegiate material may well have to pay for our higher education. Mind you, my argument is based on the ability to access education without having to spend money…teachers need to earn a living, schools need to pay the costs of operating and maintaining buildings and staff. So the money has to come from somewhere. Albeit, the aforementioned disparages between different colleges should cease the practice of who’s a better institution of higher learning. Is it the responsibility of educated people to enlighten people who are not?

While many may not be aware, education is achievable without attending so-called accredited and/or less accredited schools, of higher learning…start with the libraries in your homes as well as the public facilities, news papers, magazines, shared information, and articles. Why is the education attained by others kept to a level of secrecy that one should have to pay for it?

Attained and acquired education is the responsibility of the educational pursuer…the burden is placed solely on the student not the educational pursued. I’m not advocating that one can become a doctor, architect, or a lawyer by simply reading text…there is a difference between education and training.

Education is yours to achieve and it can be free.

Acknowledgements:

Anthololgy.2_2.22.12   The One Thing I Know is_10.1.14.jpeg

http://www.amazon.com/Gregory-V.-Boulware/e/B00OI16PDI/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Dictionary.com

Biography of William Still

Biography of the Berean Institute

View My Other Posted and Published Articles:

Ezine articles

1. IT and BI  – 9.2.7

2. Device Machine Dependent – 5.19.8

3. Brother Can You Spare the Time in Order to Make a Dime? – 10.15.8

4. A Declaration of War on Internet Piracy – 12.9.8 (BIA.6.7.9)

5. The Intel Forecast and Flash Drive Technology – 12.8.8

6. The EMR and You – 4.15.9

7. A Concurrence – The EMR and You Too – 5.25.9

8. Tech Assimilation and Warehousing of Talent – 6.7.9

9. Comprehension and Communication – More Than Being About Technology – 6.15.9 (BIA.6.14.9)

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BIA articles/Blogs

1. A Current Nigger in the Woodpile – 8.26.9

2. Digitized Downsizing or Electronic Outsourcing – 7.8.9

3. What Makes Black Folk Think That Other Black Folk Like to Party? – 4.22.9

4. The Un-Obscure – 1.21.9

5. Remember the Train (1-3) – 12.14.8, 12.30.8, and 1.13.9

6. The Essence Of Invasion And Annihilation – Gog, Magog, And Friends – 1.13.9

7. The Hebrew-Israelites And Ancient Japan – Israelites Came To Ancient Japan – 1.6.9

8. The Eye of Cain – 12.30.8

9. Legal Employment Discrimination – 8.19.8

10. Another Report On Age Discrimination – 8.12.8

11. We Are All Immigrants, Voluntary Or Otherwise – 8.4.8

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Obama and Me/Blogs:

1. Planned Disenfranchisement or a Simple Inter-Departmental Mistake – 9.4.8

2. The Great Mediator – Just Words – 2.26.8

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